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Innovation in Energy Storage – Scientists at TUM research new ways to produce lithium-ion-batteries

Members of the Chair for Strategy and Organization (Prof. Welpe) publish study on energy storage innovation in the journal Applied Energy.

If a large amount of electricity is to be produced with renewable energy sources in the future, excess energy will have to be stored during productive periods so that these fluctuations can be compensated for. However, existing storage options are far from adequate for the purpose. Science and industry are therefore working on new, better technologies. One important focus lies on battery systems that used to be too expensive or unsophisticated to be employed on a large scale. Now, a number of different electrochemical technologies are competing to become the benchmark. As companies do not readily divulge their R&D activities, economists at the TUM have analyzed worldwide patent applications relating to electrochemical energy storage between 1991 and 2011, as part of a large interdisciplinary project on battery storage.

In recent years, the number of patent applications for electrochemical energy storage technologies has soared. According to the study, the largest volume of applications by far is submitted by developers of lithium batteries. The study offers a first differentiated analysis of which energy storage technologies will be viable in the exit from fossil-fuel energy. In this area, European and US companies are falling behind economically, as Asian companies apply for a substantially higher number of patents.

The publication (described in more detail here) has been featured in a variety of reports. So far, notably Automobil Produktion, PV Magazine, ScienceDaily, Energiespektrum, Phys.org, as well as many others have mentioned the work.

Energy-briefing.de featured the first author of the study, Simon C. Müller, as quote of the week: “In view of these investments, we can assume that new electrochemical energy storage technologies will be ready for market entry in the near future and will be more cost-effective than the existing products.”

The EEBatt project:
The study is part of the EEBatt project, which focuses on decentralized stationary battery storage for an efficient use of renewable energies and support of grid stability. 14 Chairs for different disciplines at the TUM join their forces with the ZAE Bayern (Bavarian institute for applied energy research) and VARTA Storage GmbH to conduct research. The project is funded by the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Media, Energy and Technology.

Publication:
Mueller, SC, Sandner, PG, and Welpe, IM (2014). Monitoring innovation in electrochemical energy storage technologies: a patent-based approach. Applied Energy, DOI:10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.06.082

Contact person:
Simon C. Müller, M.Sc.
Technische Universität München
Chair for Strategy and Organization (Prof. Isabell M. Welpe)
Tel.: +49 89 289 24829
simon.mueller@tum.de

The post Innovation in Energy Storage – Scientists at TUM research new ways to produce lithium-ion-batteries appeared first on Technical University of Munich – School of Management.

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